An Alabama woman jailed for drug use while pregnant wasn’t even pregnant

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An Alabama woman jailed for allegedly using drugs while pregnant wasn’t even pregnant—and was imprisoned for three days before even be permitted to take a pregnancy test, every Monday report on AL.com.

Stacey Freeman was investigated by the county human resources department for suspected drug use one of their young children told a social worker her mother was pregnant. Without a medical certificate, Etowah County Sheriff’s Investigator Brandi Fuller issued a warrant for Freeman’s arrest on charges of chemical endangerment of a child. and Freeman was committed to the Etowah County Detention Center on February 1.

Freeman’s Attorney, Martin Weinberg filed a lawsuit against the sheriff’s office this week alleging the injustice, seeking unspecified damages. “It’s just embarrassing that you can hide the word from someone that someone is pregnant,” Weinberg said. “It’s easy to prove with a pregnancy test.”

Not only was Freeman absolutely not pregnant, the lawsuit states, she was on her period and was denied access to feminine hygiene products while in detention. After an earlier one report from AL.com, another woman who was also jailed on alleged drug use while pregnant, was arrested just days after giving birth, and her boyfriend told the outlet she wasn’t even given “panties or pads” and “paper towels or toilet stuffed paper down their pants to stop the bleeding.”

When Freeman was released, her lawsuit states that instead of apologizing, Fuller warned her not to get pregnant. or you may incur additional charges.

Etowah County is notorious for over-Lock up pregnant women.

“Ever since we began prosecuting and defending clients in Etowah related to pregnancy-related criminal cases, we have found a common bond. Investigator Brandi Fuller appears on nearly all of the more than 150 recent warrants and helps send people to jail for alleged “fetal rights,” said Dana Sussman, deputy executive director of Pregnancy Justice (formerly National Advocates for Pregnant Women). to Jezebel in a statement on Monday. “And now apparently even the ability to conceive is a crime in Etowah. Let’s be clear, even if she was pregnant, this shouldn’t have happened.”

In September, AL.com reported the five different pregnant or postpartum people The woman jailed on alleged drug use had recently been released, including a woman who was arrested when police learned she had recently smoked weed, the same day they learned she was pregnant. She was forced to either remain in prison or go into drug rehabilitation, which was not possible because rehabilitation centers could not accept her. Lawyers for the woman said state investigators pressured her to “confess” to a drug addiction she didn’t have, so she could access rehab, pay the $10,000 bail and get out of jail. When the woman refused, she was detained for months. Despite her high-risk pregnancy, she had to sleep on the floor of her cell because the bottom bunk was occupied by two people. She suffered from frequent bleeding and fainting spells.

Other Etowah County women were detained within days of giving birth and were sometimes separated from their newborns for months. From more than 1,700 criminalization cases related to pregnancy tracked by Pregnancy Justice between 1973 and 2020, Alabama led the nation with over 600 cases. While only 2% of Alabama’s population lives in Etowah CCountless, it accounts for over 20% of pregnancy-related prosecutions in Alabama. AL.com has reported Up to 12 pregnant or postpartum people suspected of drug use were being held in that county. i.eattention centry in August, alone.

That The sheriff’s office has claimed that its chemical vulnerability policy is designed to protect children. But they actually subject children, including newborns, to separation from a parent, while incarcerated pregnant people do twice as likely how the general population experience miscarriages. A medical expert told AL.com that “mothers’ separation from their infants has adverse effects on infant and child development, with consequences that continue into adulthood.”

In September, Etowah County District Attorney Jody Willoughby said in a statement that he “will continue to prosecute to the fullest extent of the law those who harm innocent life” — by innocent life, of course, he means unborn fetuses. The inverse of Roe v. calf and the growing anti-abortion fetal personality movement means more and more pregnant people are being monitored and monitored criminalized by criminal law enforcement agencies Agencies that prioritize the hypothetical life of a fetus over the safety and health of a pregnant person.

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